Sunday, July 31, 2011

New Crayons & Borders


New Crayons is a weekly meme hosted by we, the staff of Color Online. In this meme we share 1-2 titles we each got this week. We hope that you discover new titles and feel inclined to share the new titles you bought/received/traded for as well. Especially since Borders is being shutdown, we know you have some books to put on our radar!

Speaking of Borders, how do you feel about it being shutdown? Are you going to attend the sales? If you have been to Borders while it has its final markdowns, what did you think of the bargains?

Nathalie

Hush, Baby, Hush! Lullabies from Around the World by Kathy Henderson, illustrated by Pam Smy

A book of traditional lullabies with a difference. Gathered from all over the world, these beautiful, simple songs give a flavour of different parts of the world as well as showing that soothing a baby to sleep is the same the world over. With words in the original language plus the English version, together with a melody line and delightful illustrations by Pam Smy, this is the perfect gift book for parents of new babies.

The lullabies come from:

Australia (Aboriginal) Austria Bangladesh Brazil Czech Republic England France Greece Greenland Hungary India Iran Iraq Italy Jamaica Japan Korea Malawi Mexico Nigeria Norway Russia Spain Turkey USA (Hopi) Wales West Africa (Yoruba).

Terri

Pao by Kerry Young

As a young boy, Pao comes to Jamaica in the wake of the Chinese Civil War and rises to become the Godfather of Kingston's bustling Chinatown. Pao needs to take care of some dirty business, but he is no Don Corleone. The rackets he runs are small-time, and the protection he provides necessary, given the minority status of the Chinese in Jamaica. Pao, in fact, is a sensitive guy in a wise guy role that doesn't quite fit. Often mystified by all that he must take care of, Pao invariably turns to Sun Tzu's Art of War. The juxtaposition of the weighty, aphoristic words of the ancient Chinese sage, with the tricky criminal and romantic predicaments Pao must negotiate builds the basis of the novel's great charm.

A tale of post-colonial Jamaica from a unique and politically potent perspective, Pao moves from the last days of British rule through periods of unrest at social and economic inequality, through tides of change that will bring about Rastafarianism and the Back to Africa Movement. Pao is an utterly beguiling, unforgettable novel of race, class and creed, love and ambition, and a country in the throes of tumultuous change.

Doret

Dancing Home by Alma Flor Ada

A year of discoveries culminates in a performance full of surprises, as two girls find their own way to belong.

Mexico may be her parents’ home, but it’s certainly not Margie’s. She has finally convinced the other kids at school she is one-hundred percent American—just like them. But when her Mexican cousin Lupe visits, the image she’s created for herself crumbles.

Things aren’t easy for Lupe, either. Mexico hadn’t felt like home since her father went North to find work. Lupe’s hope of seeing him in the United States comforts her some, but learning a new language in a new school is tough. Lupe, as much as Margie, is in need of a friend.

Little by little, the girls’ individual steps find the rhythm of one shared dance, and they learn what “home” really means. In the tradition of My Name is Maria Isabel—and simultaneously published in English and in Spanish—Alma Flor Ada and her son Gabriel M. Zubizarreta offer an honest story of family, friendship, and the classic immigrant experience: becoming part of something new, while straying true to who you are
.

Ari

Till You Hear From Me by Pearl Cleage

From the acclaimed Pearl Cleage, author of What Looks Like Crazy on an Ordinary Day . . . and Seen It All and Done the Rest, comes an Obama-era romance featuring a cast of unforgettable characters.

Just when it appears that all her hard work on Barack Obama’s presidential campaign is about to pay off with a White House job, thirty-five-year-old Ida B. Wells Dunbar finds herself on Washington, D.C.’s post-election sidelines even as her twentysomething counterparts overrun the West Wing. Adding to her woes, her father, the Reverend Horace A. Dunbar, Atlanta civil rights icon and self-described “foot soldier for freedom,” is notoriously featured on an endlessly replayed YouTube clip in which his pronouncements don’t exactly jibe with the new era in American politics.

The Rev’s stinging words and myopic views don’t sound anything like the man who raised Ida to make her mark in the world. When friends call to express their concern, Ida realizes it’s time to head home and see for herself what’s going on. Besides, with her job prospects growing dimmer, getting out of D.C. for a while might be the smartest move she could make.

Back in her old West End neighborhood, Ida runs into childhood friend and smooth political operator Wes Harper, also in town to pay a visit to the Reverend Dunbar, his mentor. Ida doesn’t trust Wes or his mysterious connections for one second, but she can’t deny her growing attraction to him.

While Ida and the Rev try to find the balance between personal loyalties and political realities, they must do some serious soul searching in order to get things back on track before Wes permanently derails their best laid plans.

4 comments:

Kristi Bernard said...

You always present some really fun books featuring POC. Have you visited Inside The Books? http://www.insidethebooks.com/

Doret said...

Till You Hear From Me was very good.

I want to go to Borders to say hello to a few friends and I do need a cover for my Kobo reader

Using bubble wrap now, which is very much on the fabulous side but it works.

MissA said...

On behalf of the rest of the CO staff, thank you! No I haven't visited Inside the Books. I'll go check it out right now :)

MissA said...

@Doret-oh good! I basically got it because it said "Obama-era" I love hearing that :D Bubble wrap is super funnn. And I need a cover for my Ereader so I may steal that idea...